Make the Most of Superannuation Growth Strategies in 2022

Make the Most of Superannuation Growth Strategies in 2022

There are many strategies you can use to grow your superannuation balance and make the most of available schemes. Here are some strategies to consider when planning for the end of this financial year and setting up your financial plans for next year.

  • First home super saver scheme – this allows you to save money for your first home within your superannuation fund by making voluntary contributions into your super fund. The concessional tax treatment of super benefits individuals saving for a first home and helps you to save faster. If you’re eligible, you can apply to release your voluntary contributions and related earnings to put towards your first home deposit.
  • Work test changes – if you’re aged between 67 and 75 years old and still working, you can make salary sacrifice contributions without having to meet the work test.
  • Downsizer contributions – eligible individuals aged 60 and over can make contributions to super from the proceeds of selling your home. This allows an individual or couple to add significantly to your super fund. If you’ve sold a business, you may also be able to take advantage of this rule to contribute proceeds of business asset sales into super.
  • Transfer balance cap – this is a lifetime limit on the total amount of super that can be transferred into retirement income such as pensions. The maximum for 2022 is $1.7 million, depending on when the retirement phase income stream starts. This can be useful to consider when one member of a couple has reached their personal transfer balance cap.
  • Total super balance – your total super balance may be different from the actual super fund account balance on 30 June. Your total super balance each year determines whether you are eligible for certain super measures in the following financial year.
  • Extra contributions – you can put extra money into your super fund from pre-tax earnings with a salary sacrifice arrangement with your employer or add additional funds from your post-tax earnings. Pre-tax contributions are called concessional contributions and are taxed at a flat rate of 15%. Post-tax contributions are called non-concessional contributions and are not taxed in your super fund. There are caps on the amount you can add to your fund for both types.
  • Carry forward rule – you can make extra concessional contributions without paying extra tax if you have not contributed the maximum concessional amount in previous years.

Talk to us if you'd like to discuss tactics for increasing your super and making the most of allowable schemes. Contributing extra funds to super is generally beneficial, but certain thresholds must be observed to avoid additional tax, and some of the new rules don't start until July 2022.

Check the ATO Growing your super information to learn about available possibilities. We can help work out a customised plan for your situation to reap the benefits of strategic super planning for 2022 and beyond.


Changes to superannuation from 1 July 2022

From 1 July 2022, there are several changes to superannuation laws that you may be able to take advantage of.

Changes to voluntary contributions

If you are aged between 67 and 74, you will be able to make voluntary contributions into your superannuation without needing to meet the work test. Before 1 July 2022, if you were over the age of 67 you were required to work in gainful employment for at least 40 hours over 30 consecutive days in order to make a voluntary contribution.

The work test is only applicable from 1 July 2022, if you intend to claim a tax deduction for a voluntary contribution.

Bring-forward of non-concessional contributions

From 1 July 2022, you may be able to bring-forward 3 years’ worth of non-concessional contributions up to the age of 75.

If you are 74 years of age on 1 July 2022, and have a total superannuation balance of less than $1.48 million, your non-concessional contribution limit is $330,000 using the bring-forward rule.

Downsizer contributions

If you are over the age of 60 and you sell your family home, you may be able to make a downsizer contribution of $300,000 per person. Before 1 July 2022, the age limit was 65.

Certain eligibility requirements apply, such as owning the main residence for 10 years and making the contribution within 90 days of settlement.

Superannuation guarantee

The superannuation guarantee rate will increase from 10% to 10.5% for earnings after 1 July 2022. This rate is legislated to consistently rise up to 12% for the 2025–26 income year.

First home super saver scheme

From 1 July 2022, the maximum amount of contributions that can be released from your superannuation under the first home super saver scheme (FHSSS) will increase from $30,000 to $50,000. The increase will apply to withdrawal requests from 1 July 2022.

The yearly limit that an individual can apply to withdraw remains the same at $15,000 per year. To be eligible to access the FHSSS, these contributions must be voluntary contributions.

Any of these changes may greatly benefit your ability to grow your retirement savings, and we would be delighted to work with you in this matter.


Tax Tips for small businesses 2022

Common Tax Deductions for Small Business

Are you claiming all the business tax deductions that you are entitled to?

There are many expenses common to most small business, and there are other expenses that are specific to the nature of the goods or services that your business provides.

  • Operating expenses include accounting, administration, advertising and marketing, office premises, office running expenses, trading stock, legal fees, insurance and vehicle expenses.
  • Employment expenses include salary and wages, fringe benefits, superannuation and training costs.
  • Other operating expenses may include things specific to your business, for example point of sale systems, freight, professional membership fees, professional education, protective equipment, tools or specialised software.
  • Capital expenses include machinery and equipment, vehicles, furniture and computers. Depreciation for these assets may also be deductible if the expense was not written off immediately.
  • Repairs and maintenance to assets and business premises.

Expenses must relate to the running of the business and providing the goods or services that your business offers.

Some common expenses that are not deductible are fines and penalties, provisions for employee leave, donations to entities not registered as deductible gift recipients and entertainment.

There may be some expenses you want to check with us such as private usage of business vehicles, prepaid expenses, bad debts, loss of stock and borrowing expenses. We’ll make sure to include all the deductions you’re entitled to.

What’s on the ATO Radar for 2022?

This year the ATO will be taking a closer look at record keeping, work related expenses, rental property income and deductions and cryptocurrency transactions.

  • Keep records for all business transactions (income and expenses), activity statements and financial reports for at least five years.
  • Keep all records relating to employees, contractors and payroll for at least seven years.
  • If your business is a company, keep all records for at least seven years, including director meeting minutes.

Other Common Tax Return Issues

  • Work-related travel expenses – travel fares, accommodation, meals. The travel should be directly related to income producing activities and you need records to verify the travel claims.
  • Motor vehicle expenses – keep records for fuel, repairs and servicing, finance arrangements, insurance and registration. Keep a logbook to record private travel.
  • Fringe benefits – have you captured all benefits provided to employees? Vehicle and entertainment benefits are usually scrutinised. This year you’ll need records of any extra benefits provided to employees because of COVID-19.
  • Superannuation – have you paid the superannuation guarantee on time to employees’ super funds? The ATO will examine your Single Touch Payroll records including superannuation payments.
  • Current temporary tax depreciation incentives - There are currently three temporary tax depreciation incentives available to eligible businesses:

Talk to us about what applies for your business.

Maximise Your Business Deductions

We can check your business’s eligibility for concessions, offsets, employer incentives and rebates and make sure your business is calculating taxable income correctly, so you don’t pay more tax than you need to!

With so many businesses still affected by COVID-19, it’s important to get the allowable tax deductions right for your business and get in early for your tax return. This way you get more time to plan for payment, or if you are due a refund you will see it in your bank sooner.


Tax Tips for Property Investors 2022

If you have income from investment properties, now is the time to start gathering your records and reviewing your expenses for the 2022 financial year.

Income to Declare

All income earned from each property must be declared. If you have multiple properties, keep the records for each property separate to make the tax return more efficient.

  • Rent received, whether paid directly to you or through an agent or through an online management platform. Rent includes recurring regular amounts as well as any lump sum amounts paid in advance.
  • Rental bonds returned for example if the tenant caused damage or defaulted on rent payment.
  • Insurance payouts received as compensation.
  • Expenses reimbursed by the tenant, for example if they have caused damage and you have paid for the cost of fixing the damages, or if they have reimbursed you for water.
  • Extra fees received, for example letting or booking fees.
  • Government rebates, for example for installation of solar utilities.

You will need statements or recipient created tax invoices from agents or management platforms and documents for all other payments received.

Tax Deductions

Deductible expenses for property are different for residential and commercial properties. Not all expenses related to owning a property are allowed as deductions, so it’s important to check what you can claim.

Expenses You May be Able to Claim This Year

  • Advertising for tenants
  • Body corporate fees
  • Council rates
  • Water supply charges
  • Land tax
  • Cleaning, gardening, pest control and property maintenance
  • Insurance
  • Agent fees
  • Repairs and maintenance
  • Some legal expenses
  • Loan interest

Other Expenses

There are some expenses which need to be claimed over a longer period such as several years or decades. These can include borrowing expenses, capital expenditure, depreciation, initial repairs and capital works.

Some expenses cannot be claimed for. These include stamp duty, loans and repayments, some legal expenses and some insurance premiums.

Get Help to Simplify Your Property Records

Tax matters for property investors can be complex. The ATO keeps a close eye on tax returns that involve property investment, as it’s easy to make mistakes. There are other matters to consider such as the period of rental availability, private use of the property, capital gains tax, legal contracts and positive or negative gearing. This year for many owners there will be insurance claims because of floods.

We’d love to help ensure you are claiming the right deductions to make the most out of your investment property this year and beyond. Book a time now for your 2022 tax return.


Tax tips for self-managed superannuation funds 2022

Having a self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF) gives you control and flexibility over how you make investments and prepare for retirement.

It’s important to get your deductions and record keeping correct for the SMSF audit process and the tax return, as there are strict laws governing SMSFs.

An SMSF must be set up as a trust and must also have a legal document called a trust deed. A super fund trust is set up for the sole purpose of providing retirement benefits to its beneficiaries. The trust deed governs how the fund is set up and how it will operate and must be used in conjunction with the superannuation laws.

There are many different investment strategies for SMSFs according to the fund’s trust deed and operations.

Common Tax Deductions

Deductible expenses for SMSFs vary according to the nature of investments and the trust deed, however there are some general expenses that apply to most funds.

  • Operating expenses, such as management and administration fees, audit fees and ASIC annual fees.
  • Investment-related expenses, such as interest, investment advice fees, costs of servicing and managing investments, property fees and brokerage fees.
  • Tax-related expenses, such as preparing the SMSF annual return.
  • Legal expenses including amending trust deeds.
  • SMSF statutory fees and levies.
  • Insurance premiums for death, total and permanent disability, terminal illness and income protection.

The rules for tax deductibility for SMSFs are different to those for individuals and business. Many people are used to claiming deductions for certain things in business or property investment and find they don’t apply to SMSF tax returns. We can help clarify what’s deductible and what’s not.

Expenses must relate to the sole purpose of the super fund being to provide retirement benefits to its members. There may be some items you want to query with us for the audit and tax return to see if they meet the sole purpose test, such as investment training courses, collectibles and artwork, travel expenses or personal computers.

SMSF Annual Return and Records

Once the formal audit of the SMSF has been completed, the annual return must be lodged with the ATO. The annual return is not only a tax return but also reports regulatory information and member contributions. You must keep all records relevant to the annual return.

  • Keep all transaction, tax, accounting and financial reporting records for at least five years.
  • Keep all records relating to trustee meetings, minutes, investment strategies and appointments or changes of trustees for at least ten years.

Make Your SMSF Management Easy

SMSF management can be time consuming. We can help with researching and managing investments, checking trust deed compliance, setting investment strategies, keeping records and conducting the audit.

Talk to us now and get ahead for your next annual SMSF return.


Tax Tips for Individuals 2022

Although your tax return is not due for a few months yet, the end of the financial year is nearing…have you captured all your work-related deductible expenses to make the most of your 2022 tax return?

Income

The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) automatically receives information from your employers about salary and wages that you have been paid for the financial year. You need to declare all income from other sources on your tax return as well.

  • Wages and salaries from employment.
  • Pensions, annuities or government payments such as JobKeeper.
  • Investment income including interest earned and dividends paid.
  • Cryptocurrency gains or losses.
  • Business or hobby income.
  • Foreign income.
  • Crowdfunding income.
  • Sharing economy income such as Uber or Airbnb.
  • Any other income such as prize money, compensation or insurance payments.

Even if you have only earned a small amount from one of these sources, it still needs to be declared on the tax return. Gather all your records for anything you have earned apart from salary and wage payments from employers.

You will need:

  • bank statements that show interest income;
  • proof of earnings from other sources such as crowdfunding or share economy platforms;
  • records of business or hobby income;
  • records of government payments received;
  • records from cryptocurrency wallets showing transactions and the balance of each currency at 30 June;
  • and records of any other payments received from overseas sources, prize winnings, insurance or investments.

Tax Deductions

Employees are entitled to claim work-related expenses as a tax deduction. To claim a tax deduction, you must have spent the money out of your own funds and not have been reimbursed by your employer. The expenses must relate to your earnings as an employee. Make sure you have invoices and receipts as proof of payment for any work-related expenses.

Expenses you may be able to claim

  • Vehicle and travel expenses – make sure you have a travel diary to record details of trips taken for your employment.
  • Clothing, laundry and dry-cleaning expenses – you can claim for occupation specific clothing, uniforms and protective gear.
  • Home office expenses – the shortcut calculation is still available this year for people who have worked from home due to COVID-19. This allows for a flat rate of 80 cents per hour for work time. You will need records of the hours you have worked from home to claim the ATO special rate. For people who usually work from home, check the ATO home office expenses calculator to maximise the allowable deduction.
  • Self-education expenses – some education expenses that relate to your current employment are claimable.
  • Tools and equipment – if you buy gear to help you in your job, these may be claimable. Small tools of trade, protective items, professional references and laptops are some examples of equipment you may be able to claim.

Occupation and Industry Specific Guidelines

The ATO recognises that some occupations and industries have specific requirements that employees need to pay for.

There are handy ATO fact sheets for many industries, including hairdressers, teachers, performing artists, hospitality workers, lawyers, medical professionals and more.

These guides are a great starting point if you are not sure what you can claim, but we can give you information tailored to your situation when you do your tax return.

Superannuation

If you have made personal superannuation contributions separate to your employer’s superannuation guarantee contributions, you may be able to claim this as a tax deduction. You will need to provide a notice of intent to claim form to your super fund and receive acknowledgement from the fund before doing your tax return.

Book a time with us now to prepare for your tax return and we’ll make sure you maximise your allowable tax deductions this year.


Business tips: Budgeting and managing cashflow

If you want to stabilise your finances and grow the business, working to strict budgets becomes a necessity. Managing the cashflow twists and turns of a project can be hard work. But it’s easier to do when you have an agreed budget and can track your spending and performance.

So, what’s the best way to stay in control of the budgets you’ve set? And how can you manage your cashflow position to make sure there’s always enough cash to fund the project?

Understand the costs of each project

Starting a project without fully understanding how much it will cost is a no-no. To keep on top of costs, overheads, staff expenses and general spending, you need at least a ballpark figure for this expenditure. In an ideal world, you’ll want to be as precise as possible with these costs.

Run through the project from start to finish and highlight every point where there will be costs to incur. It might be the cost of your raw materials. It may be the cost of buying new equipment. It could be the payroll costs for the people actively working on the project. Break everything down and come up with a total expense for the project. This is your starting point.

Set your budget and track it over time

Once you know your baseline cost for the project, you and your team should decide on the amount of funds to allocate to the budget. Your baseline cost is a starting point, but don’t forget to include extra for specific contingencies. What if the project overruns? What if your raw material costs go sky high? What if you need more people to get the job over the line?

Agree on a clear budget and set up your finance system to track spending against this budget. With a cloud accounting system at the heart of the business, it’s very easy to create a budget and then record and track your spending over time.

Keep a close eye on budgets and project cashflow

One of the big things to remember is that a budget is not a static thing. You’ll obviously aim to stick to your initial costs, but prices and availability will affect the total spend over time. Because of this, it’s vital to not just write the budget and then forget about it.

Keep a close eye on your budget performance and the cashflow for each project. Being able to review this performance, in real time, should help you avoid overspending, or running out of cash for the project. And when the cash in the kitty is getting low, you can get proactive and look at ways to top up the budget, or rein in spending in other areas of the project.

Take action to maintain your positive cashflow position

Balancing the cashflow scales on a project isn’t easy. But when you spot that there’s a potential hole in the budget, the important thing is to do something about it, pronto!

Running any project with your fingers crossed that ‘it will all work out in the end’ is a recipe for disaster. And with such detailed budget reports and cashflow forecasts available with today’s finance apps, there’s really no need to be disorganised about your spending.

Think about:

  • Setting up key metrics for each project, to measure spending, cashflow and progress
  • Run worst-case and best-case cashflow scenarios, so you’re prepared for anything
  • Regularly reviewing your spending and looking for areas to make savings
  • Taking on finance facilities to plug any cashflow holes as they appear.

If you’re thinking about scaling up your established startup, please do get in touch. We’ll help you build solid, workable budgets that can be easily tracked through your accounting system.


Business tips: Making it easier to get paid

Making sure you get paid on time is crucial to your success. The process of making sales and generating revenue lies at the heart of any business model. But you can't manage your cashflow effectively or raise any profits if customers don't actually pay their invoices.

The easier you can make it for customers to pay you, the faster you'll see cash coming into the business. That’s good news for your financial position, your ability to cover your operational costs and your capacity to fund the growth and expansion of your business.

So, how do you speed up those payments and make sure you get paid on time?

Set out clear payment terms

Your payment terms are the starting point for healthy payment times. These terms set out when you expect to be paid and form a legally binding contract with the customer. You may expect immediate payment on receipt of the invoice. Or you might set out a specific number of days that the customer has to pay the invoice (generally 30, 60, 90 or 120 days, depending on your industry). This is sometimes called ‘trade credit’ and allows your customers to pay for goods and services at a later, pre-agreed date – helping them to spread the cost.

Your payment terms should also include details of any late payment penalties. If the customer doesn’t meet your agreed payment times, most businesses will add a 1% to 1.5% monthly late payment fee to the outstanding bill. This acts as a great incentive for the customer to pay the bill, before the penalty fees start mounting up.

Invoice customers as soon as you can

In a business-to-consumer (B2C) environment, your customers will generally pay for their goods and services immediately. But when you’re working in the business-to-business (B2B) world, you’ll need to send your customer an invoice, asking for the money to be paid.

A customer can’t settle their bill until you send them an invoice. So, it’s vital to send out the invoice as quickly as possible, so you can minimise the gap between doing the work and being paid for the work. In some industries, the project will be broken down into multiple invoices, paid across a period of time. This makes it easier for the customer to pay, and means you (as the supplier) don’t have to complete the project before receiving the money you’re owed.

Ideally, you want your invoices to go out as early as possible. This allows your payment terms to kick in and makes it easier to predict when cash will be coming into the business.

Be organised about your payment admin

Getting paid is a process – and the more organised you make the process, the quicker the payment will be received. When you send out the invoice, make sure you send it to all the relevant people in the payment chain. This will usually be:

  • Your main contact at the client – the person who you usually deal with
  • The person who will approve the bill – the person who will green-light the payment
  • The finance team – the person (or people) who will actually action the payment.

It’s also a good idea to quote any relevant purchase order (PO) numbers that the customer has raised, and to give a very clear description of the work done, or the goods purchased.

Embrace the available payment technology

Invoices used to be hard-copy printed bills, but in the digital age the vast majority of companies will send out e-invoices. Electronic invoices are easy to raise (usually from your accounting software or project management app) and can be emailed out instantly. Doing everything in the digital realm also makes it easier to keep records and keep track of payments.

Many e-invoice systems will also let you add a variety of different payment options for the customer. You could just include your bank details and wait for the customer to make a direct payment to your account. But you can also include payment buttons in the e-invoice that give customers the option to pay via digital payment gateways, like PayPal or GoCardless etc.

Offering more ways to pay makes the whole process more convenient for your customers – and will generally result in faster payment times as a result.

If you want to speed up your payment times and boost your cashflow, please do get in touch. We can help you streamline your payment processes and embrace the latest in payment tech.


Business Tips: Setting KPIs and measuring performance

Once you begin trading, you’re faced with a new challenge – successfully managing the course of your brand-new business and making sure it’s a profitable enterprise.

It’s easier to manage your startup’s sales and finances when you have access to the best possible information and data about your performance. Tracking specific metrics and key performance indicators (KPIs) allows you to see how you're performing against your targets – so you can take action to improve performance, sales, growth and profitability.

But which KPIs should you be tracking?

Sales and conversion rates

An obvious metric to track is the number of sales you’re making each month. You’ll have set a target for these sales in your business plan, so it’s important to record each sale and see how the startup is performing over the first six months of the business.

It’s also important to log and track the drivers that lead to these sales. How many sales enquiries are you receiving? How many of these enquiries are being converted into actual sales? How many customers are being engaged by your marketing campaigns, and is this engagement leading to interest in your products and/or services.

The more detail you can track from your sales and marketing activity, the more forensic you can get with which campaigns are actually delivering the goods.

Sales revenue and other revenues

When customers buy your goods, that creates income (or revenue) for the business. Ultimately, no business can succeed unless it’s generating enough revenue to keep the wheels turning in the business. So, tracking your sales revenue is a vital measure of your financial health.Tracking your various revenue streams over time keeps you in control of your finances and helps you make the right decisions. You can track performance against your revenue targets. You can forecast how much working capital you’ll have at a future point in time. And you can see if there’s enough cash in the bank to fund your projects and growth plans.

Cashflow and ongoing cash position

Good cashflow management is all about balancing the process of cash coming INTO the business and cash going OUT if the business. Recording and tracking your cash position is easy to do with the latest cloud accounting software and cashflow apps, so there’s no excuse for not tracking your cash position.

Ideally, you want the business to be in a positive cashflow position (with more cash coming in, than going out). But to achieve this, it’s helpful to see these cash inflows and outflows in real-time. With up-to-date metrics on your cashflow position, you can make informed decisions about spending, payment of bills and where additional cash and funding may be needed.

Debtor days and aged debt

When customers fail to pay your invoice on time, that creates an aged debt – money that you SHOULD have received but which the customer has yet to pay. An aged debtor report shows you which invoices are unpaid, which customers haven’t paid, and the total size of this debt.

Your debtor days number is a metric that shows the average number of days it takes your customers to pay you. Anything above 45 days is bad news, so you want to aim to keep this number between 14 to 30 days, if possible. A large amount of aged debt will leave a hole in your cashflow – and that can quickly start to impact on the day-to-day running of the business.

Gross profit margin

Generating a profit is crucial to the continued success of your startup. Having metrics to measure your profitability is an important part of managing your finances.

One common way to do this is to track your gross profit margin. This metric shows the amount of profit made BEFORE you deduct things like overheads and the cost of goods sold (COGS), shown as a percentage. The formula for calculating your gross profit margin looks like this:

Gross Profit Margin = Gross Revenue minus COGS, divided by Net Revenue, multiplied by 100

  • Deduct your COGS value from your gross revenue to find your gross profit.
  • Divide this gross profit by your revenue.
  • Multiply the resulting number by 100 to get a percentage.
  • This is your gross profit margin as a percentage of gross profit
  • A percentage of 50% to 70% is healthy, but aim for a big a margin as possible

By keeping a close eye on these financial metrics and KPIs, you have the best possible insight into the performance of your new startup – and that’s invaluable as your startup journey unfolds.

If you’re at the early stages of planning out your business idea, please do get in touch. We’ll help you set up a custom KPI dashboard to manage the future path of your business


Business tips - Scaling up your business and workforce

Scaling up your business isn't about steady growth over time. It's about having a clear strategy for quickly expanding the business to achieve full-scale hypergrowth.

Most startups grow organically, adding customers here and there and gradually expanding over time. Scaling up aims to accelerate this process, pushing your growth to move beyond that slow, organic pace. To achieve this, every element of your business model needs to be reviewed, refined and systemised – so you have scalability built into the company from the ground up.

Systemise your processes and build scalability into your DNA

Scaling up is a fast-paced, hectic and transformative process for any business. But with the right planning, strategy and funding, the return on your scale-up investment can be significant. Systemisation is the starting point and the driver of your efficiency.

The aim of your systemisation process is to make the business ordered, standardised and efficient. Look at how the business works. Write down every process and operational action. Then see how these processes can be made as lean and effective as possible, and aim to make these operations easily repeatable – so they can scale on demand as the business grows.

If any processes can be automated, automate them. Automation is a key driver of productivity and efficiency, so make use of any tech that could help you get more streamlined.

Remove yourself from the everyday running of the business

This may sound counterproductive, but a big goal of a scale-up strategy is to make yourself redundant from the everyday business. If all the operational elements of the business have to pass through you, as the founder and CEO, then that limits your ability to scale.

Remove yourself from the equation, so the business can grow without your everyday input at the operational level. This allows the business to function without you, leaving you with more time to focus on the high-level strategic work. That’s more time for business development. More time working on innovation. More time building relationships with customers and suppliers.

Expand your executive team and workforce

Once you’ve stepped back from the day-to-day tasks, your CEO role can become far more of a driving force behind the growth of the business. But you can’t do this single-handedly. You’ll need a close and trusted executive team to work with. Plus an experienced management team who you can delegate to. And an expanded workforce at all levels of the organisation.

As the startup evolves into scale-up, the business will become more complex and the workload will increase. To cope with this and keep the company running like a well-oiled machine you need a team who are ready for the task and fully on-board with your aims for the business.

Increase your operational infrastructure

Hypergrowth of the business means a greater volume of sales and work. To meet this demand, you urgently need to expand your operational infrastructure. That means looking at the size of your workspace. The amount of tech, equipment and machinery you have. And the ways you deliver your end product/service to your increased customer base.

The key here is to apply a LEAN methodology – keeping everything as simple and basic as possible, while also building in the capacity to deal with this increased volume of work. Get the operational procedures out of your own head and turn them into lean, seamless processes. And invest in the equipment and operational systems needed to cope with your increased output.

Look at investment and access to funding

To bring your scale-up plans to life, there’s a need to invest heavily in the future of the business. You’re likely to need new assets and equipment. Larger premises or multiple workspaces. More raw materials or stock. And a bigger workforce – which will mean a larger payroll each month.

You may be in the fortunate position of having plenty of spare cash in your reserves. But for most potential scale-ups, there’s going to be a need for external funding. This could mean you and your fellow directors putting money into the business. It could mean approach lenders and business finance providers to take out a loan. Or it could mean looking for private investors to plough money into the business. Whatever the source of this additional funding, you a clear funding strategy to work from – a funding plan that’s aligned with your scale-up plan.

Share your strategic goal and growth plan

For scaling up to be a success, everyone in the company must be on board with the idea. Make your growth aim and key numbers transparent, so the whole team is engaged and motivated by this common aim. And make sure you have a detailed scale-up plan that factors in the challenges of expanding your workforce, resources and operational infrastructure.

Think about:

  • WHY you want to scale and what the end goal will be
  • HOW you will achieve this – and what the timescales will be
  • WHO you need on board to make this work
  • WHAT new assets and equipment will be needed
  • WHERE the funding will come from to bankroll this plan.

If you’re thinking about scaling up your established startup, please do get in touch. We’ll help you build a viable scale-up plan, with costings, budgets and achievable targets to meet.